2023-24 Upperclassmen Course Catalog

Tennessee High School
Upperclassmen Course Catalog
2023-2024

 

Summary Sheet

 

COURSE REQUIREMENTS AT THS
  There are 28 credits required for graduation.


CLUBS
 A summary of clubs and membership requirements is included in the THS Student Handbook.

 

COMMUNITY SERVICE HOURS
Service is defined through the voluntary contributions made by a student to the school or a community agency, done without compensation or course credit, and with a positive, courteous, and enthusiastic spirit. Students who complete 10 community service hours each semester will be recognized at graduation.

 

GPA AND CLASS RANKStudent grade point averages and class rank are calculated at the end of each semester.

LETTER                      NUMERICAL GRADE             GRADE POINT VALUE

   A                                     90 – 100                                    4 points

  B                                      80 – 89                                      3 points

  C                                     70 – 79                                       2 points

  D                                     60 – 69                                       1 point

  F                                     59 and below                              0 points

 

The overall grade point average is computed by totaling all the grade points and dividing the total by the number of courses taken.

Example: A student makes a 95A, 85B, 89B and an 74C. Add the numerical values of 4+3+3+2= 12; then divide 12 by 4 (the number of classes) to calculate a GPA of 3.0.

 

REGISTRATION

Students will complete registration in the spring semester with their counselor.

 

SCHOLARSHIPS

Scholarship information is placed on the counseling office webpage at  http://ths.btcs.org/counseling.

 

STUDENT ATHLETES

If students aspire to participate in collegiate athletics, they should be mindful of the NCAA course requirements. Students also need to satisfy the GPA and test score requirements on the NCAA sliding scale. Please remember that the NCAA only considers grades in core classes for eligibility purposes. Please visit http://www.ncaa.org/wps/wcm/connect/public/NCAA/Eligibility/index.html for more information.

 

TESTING TERMS

Test requirements vary among colleges as does the weight the test scores carry in the admissions decision. Below are definitions of the most widely used tests:

 

ACT: The ACT combines certain aspects of both the SAT I and SAT II into one test. It is a multiplechoice test and the scores range from 0 to 36. There are four parts to the test: English, Social Sciences, Natural Sciences and Mathematics. The Writing Test is optional.

PSAT/NMSQT: The Preliminary Scholastic Aptitude Test and the National Merit Scholarship Qualifying Test provide a practice SAT test for college bound students in the fall of their junior year.

SAT : The Scholastic Aptitude Test is one of the factors used as college admissions criteria. It is a multiplechoice test that is designed to test the student’s aptitude for scholastic work (not intelligence). The SAT is usually taken in the spring of the junior year and again in the fall of the senior year. Scores are broken down into critical reading, mathematical and writing categories and range from 200 to 800 per section. Total scores range from 400-1600, where 1600 would be a perfect score. Colleges differ on the average SAT score which they expect of applicants.

AP: Advanced Placement Tests are usually taken after a student has completed an Advanced Placement course in a specific academic area. These tests normally cost $96.00. Students can earn college credit and/or advanced standing in college based on their scores that range from 1 to 5.

CLEP: College-Level Examination Program courses are taught on a college level and are designed to prepare students to take the CLEP test which, with qualifying scores, may
permit them to receive college credit from many post- secondary institutions.


DUAL CREDIT/ ARTICULATION:
Northeast State Community College, in partnership with Tennessee High, enables high school students to take selected high school courses which may later articulate to Northeast State. Articulation means that the student, upon demonstrating subject matter competency at the college level, can receive credit for college-level courses upon enrollment at Northeast State. This partnership enables the student/the college/and the State of Tennessee to save time and money while at the same time results in the student getting an early start to college, graduating earlier, and entering the workforce sooner.

CTE students must pass the articulation assessments with a minimum grade of a "C". Health-Related Professions students must pass with a minimum grade of a "B". The college credit will then be transcribed to the student’s transcript upon enrollment and continued student status beyond the two-week enrollment period. See CTE course listings for more information.

Students may bring up to eight hours of college level credit with them upon enrollment at Northeast State within two years of graduation from high school.

         Tennessee High School Code: (for SAT I, SAT II and ACT tests): 430180

 

TENNESSEE HOPE SCHOLARSHIP
(Lottery Scholarship)

Award Amount: $1750 per semester for a four year college/university or $1500 per semester for a two-year college.

Students must meet the following requirements:

Entering freshmen must have a minimum of a 21 ACT (980 SAT), exclusive of the essay and optional subject area battery tests
OR
Overall weighted minimum 3.0 grade point average (GPA)



(General Assembly Merit Scholarship)

Award Amount: $1,000 in addition to Hope Scholarship funds

Students must meet the following requirements:

Students graduating from a Tennessee public school must have a minimum 3.75 weighted GPA AND 29 ACT (1280 SAT), exclusive of the essay and optional subject area battery tests.

(Wilder-Naifeh Technical Skills Grant)

Award amount – $667 per trimester

Wilder-Naifeh Technical Skills Grant Recipients Must:

Enroll in a certificate or diploma program at a Tennessee Center for Applied Technology

Cannot be prior recipient of Tennessee HOPE Scholarship or Wilder-Naifeh Technical Skills Grant.

Available to all students enrolled at a Tennessee Technology Center who are TN residents 1 year prior to the term school begins

 

TENNESSEE PROMISE

Tennessee Promise offers two years of tuition-free community or technical college to Tennessee high school graduates. A critical component is the individual guidance each participant will receive from a mentor who will assist the student as he or she navigates the college admissions process. In addition, Tennessee Promise participants must complete eight hours of community service per term enrolled, as well as maintain satisfactory academic progress (2.0 GPA) at their institution.

Award Amount – Amount varies based on the amount of remaining tuition and mandatory fees after all other aid has first been applied.

                                                                               

TN SCHOLARS

This is a program designed to recognize students for academic excellence, good attendance and community involvement. Please visit http://www.tnscholars.org/ for more information.

 

TUTORING

Tutoring is available after school with individual teachers. Students may also attend the Afterschool program for tutoring and activities; this program is available Monday-Thursday from 2:30-5:30 PM.

 

SUMMER READING

Summer Reading will be required of all English classes. Summer reading information will be available on the Tennessee High School website.


THS Minimum Graduation Requirements

English

4 credits

English I

 

English II

English III

English IV

Math

4 credits

Integrated Math I

Students must take a math course every year.

Integrated Math II

Integrated Math III

One additional credit beyond

Integrated Math III

Science

3 credits

Biology

Anatomy and Physiology

or

Engineering Design I or II

may count as a 3rd lab Science.

 

Chemistry or Physics

One additional Lab Science (i.e. Physical Science, AP Biology, AP Chemistry, etc.)

Social Studies

3 credits

World History / AP Human Geography

 

U.S. History

U.S. Government/ Economics

Physical Education

2 credits

Wellness

2 semesters of JROTC may substitute for Wellness.

PE/Driver's Education

Foreign Language

2 credits

2 semesters of the same Language

 

 

Fine Arts

1 credit

Art, Choral Music, Theatre, Digital Art and Design, or Instrumental Music

 

Program of Study

3 credits

Focused Elective Program of Study (POS)

Choose from AP, Fine Arts, Humanities, Math/Science, CTE, or JROTC

Personal Finance

.5 credit

 

 

Electives

5.5 credits

 

 




Programs of Study 2023-2024

Students must complete 3 electives from a single Program of Study (POS) per graduation requirements.


Academic

Advanced Placement

AP Art

AP Biology

AP Calculus

AP Chemistry

AP Literature and Composition

AP Human Geography

AP Physics 1

AP Psychology

AP US History

AP Language and Composition

AP Music Theory

AP Spanish Language and Composition

AP Computer Science

Fine Arts

Concert Choir

Instrumental Music

Music Theory

Art 1, Art 2, Art 3

AP Art

Percussion

Color Guard

Madrigals

Theatre Arts 1, Theatre Arts 2

AP Music Theory

Women’s Ensemble

Color Guard

Digital Arts 1

Web Design

Math/ Science

Pre-Calculus

AP Calculus

Statistics

Chemistry/Physics

AP Chemistry

Environmental Science

AP Physics 1

AP Biology

Anatomy and Physiology

Humanities

Creative Writing 1      

German 1, 2, 3, 4

Public Speaking                                 

AP English Literature

Spanish 1, 2, 3, 4

Journalism (Yearbook)                      

Journalism (Maroon & White)

AP English Language

Mythology/Etymology

French 1, 2, 3,

Psychology/ AP Psychology

Contemporary Issues

 

Career and Technical Education (24 Programs of Study offered)

 

Advanced Manufacturing

Machining Technology:

Principles of Manufacturing (PMI)

Principles of Machining I

Dual Enroll:  Quality & Inspection; Industrial Safety; Machine Tool Operations I

Dual Enroll:  Blueprint Reading; Machine Tool Operations II

Northeast State Semester 3 (at NE State):

CNC Programming I; Machine Tool Op III;

CNC Machine Operations I

Ind. Cert.: PMI (Precision Meas. Inst.)

Dual Credit at TCAT Eliz.: PMI Ind. Cert. = 90 hrs

           

Welding:

Principles of Manufacturing

Welding I

Dual Enroll. TCAT Welding 1/2 (120 hours)

Dual Enroll. TCAT Welding 3/4 (120 hours)

Dual Enroll. TCAT Pipefitting (120 hours)

Ind. Cert.: AWS Cert. Welder; OSHA 10 Manufacturing; (NE State DC Test)


Agriculture, Food, & Natural Resources

Environmental and Natural Resource Management:

AgriScience

Fisheries & Wildlife Science

Animal Science

Ind. Cert.: OSHA 10 Agriculture, Ducks Unlimited, Ecology Conservation & Management, ELANCO Animal Science

 

Architecture & Construction

Architectural & Engineering Design

      Architectural Design I

    Architectural Design II

    Architectural Design III

 

Mechanical, Electrical, & Plumbing (MEP) Systems:

Fundamentals of Construction (OSHA10, NCCER)

MEP Systems

Plumbing Systems

Ind. Cert.: OSHA 10 Construction; NCCER Core

 

HVAC Systems:

Fundamentals of Construction

 Northeast State HVAC (Sem. 1)

             Northeast State HVAC (Sem. 2)

             Northeast State HVAC (Sem. 3)

             Northeast State HVAC (Sem. 4)

 

Residential & Commercial Construction:

Fundamentals of Construction (OSHA10, NCCER)

Dual Enroll. TCAT Building Construction I (NCCER Const. Tech, NCCER Fall Protection)

Dual Enroll. TCAT Building Construction II (Carpentry 1)

Ind. Cert.: OSHA 10 Construction; NCCER Core; NCCER Construction Technology; NCCER Fall Protection Orientation; NCCER Carpentry 1

 

Arts, Audio/Visual Technology, & Communications

Digital Arts & Design:

Digital Arts & Design 1

Digital Arts & Design 2

Digital Arts & Design 3

Ind. Cert.: Adobe Certified Professional

 

Business Management & Administration

Business Management:

Business Management (1 year only)

CLEP Test:  Principles of Management

 

Education and Training

Teaching as a Profession (K-12)

Introduction to Teaching as a Profession

Teaching as a Profession I

Teaching as a Profession II

Teaching as a Profession Practicum

           

 Government & Public Administration

Leadership in Government

            JROTC I

            JROTC II

            JROTC III

            JROTC IV


Health Science

Nursing Services

Health Science Education

Anatomy & Physiology

Medical Therapeutics (NEState Dual Credit CPR Test)

Nursing Education (CNA--Cert. Nursing Asst.) and Clinical Internship (students enroll in both) Ind. Cert.: OSHA10 Healthcare; CNA--Cert. Nursing Asst


Therapeutic Services

Health Science Education

Anatomy & Physiology

Medical Therapeutics (NEState Dual Credit CPR)

Pharmacological Science (NEState Dual Credit CPR) and Clinical Internship (students enroll in both)

Ind. Cert.: OSHA10 Healthcare, Cert. Pharm. Tech.


Sport and Human Performance

Health Science Education

Anatomy & Physiology

Rehabilitation Careers (NEState Dual Credit CPR Test)

Ind. Cert.: OSHA10 Healthcare


Hospitality & Tourism

Culinary Arts:

Culinary Arts 1 (OSHA10)

Culinary Arts 2 (ServeSafe Food Manager)

Culinary Arts 3

Culinary Arts 4

Ind. Cert.: OSHA10, ServeSafe Food Manager

 

Human Services

Cosmetology:

Cosmetology 1

Dual Enroll. TCAT Cosmetology 1/2 (120 hours)

Dual Enroll. TCAT Cosmetology 3/4 (120 hours)

Dual Enroll. TCAT Cosmetology 5/6 (120 hours)

Ind. Cert.: OSHA10 Cosmetology

 

Information Technology

Coding:

Computer Science Foundations

Coding I

AP Computer Science Principles

 

Cybersecurity:

Computer Science Foundations

Cybersecurity I

Cybersecurity II

AP Computer Science Principles

 

Web Design:

Computer Science Foundations

Web Design Foundations

AP Computer Science Principles

Ind. Cert.: Comp. TIA Foundations

 

Law, Corrections, & Security

Criminal Justice & Correction Services:

Criminal Justice I

Criminal Justice II

Dual Enroll. Intro. to Criminal Justice (CRMJ 1010) and Intro. to Legal Process (CRMJ 1020)

Ind. Cert.: OSHA10 for Public Safety

 

Marketing, Distribution & Logistics:

Marketing Management:

Intro to Marketing and Entrepreneurship

Marketing and Entrepreneurship (CLEP)

Social Media Marketing and Analytics

CLEP Test: Principles of Marketing

Ind. Cert. Hootsuite Social Media Cert.

 

STEM

Engineering:

Principles of Engineering & Technology

Engineering I

Engineering II

Ind. Cert.: Dremel 3D Printing

 

Transportation, Distribution, & Logistics

Automotive Maintenance & Light Repair:

(all classes at Friendship Career Center)

Maintenance & Light Repair 1

Dual Enroll. TCAT Automotive 1/2 (120 hours)

Dual Enroll. TCAT Automotive 3/4 (120 hours)

Dual Enroll. TCAT Automotive 5/6 (120 hours)

Ind. Cert.: NC3 Multimeter, NC3 Hand Tool

 

Automotive Collision Repair:

Dual Enroll:NEState Paint & Refinishing 3 hrs (at THS)

Dual Enroll: NEState Special Topics Auto 1 hr (at THS)

Dual Enroll: NEState Non-Structural Rep 4 hr (at THS)

 

*Work-Based Learning Practicum can count as the 3rd or 4th level of all Programs of Study).

Industry Certification opportunity:

                    OSHA10 General Industry


*The WorkKeys Test is taken by seniors in the Spring. Students can earn the National Career Readiness Certificate (NCRC) with a qualifying score which will qualify students for Dual Credit (Technology Foundations) at TCAT Elizabethton and Dual Credit at Northeast State. 

Comparison of Graduation Honors

 

Tennessee High School Graduates of Highest Distinction

State of Tennessee Honors

Tennessee Scholars

Graduating with Honors

Graduating with

“State Distinction”

4 or more completed AP credits

Score at or above all subject area readiness benchmarks on ACT

“B” average, and one of the following:

All Tennessee minimum graduation requirements plus the following:

95 or above cumulative average (taken from final term grades)

Benchmarks are:

Earn a nationally recognized industry certificate

2 Career Technical Education Courses (Computer class may count as 1 CTE credit)

29 or above ACT composite or

Mathematics – 22

Participate in at least one of the Governor’s Schools

- or -

1280 or above SAT composite

English - 18

Participate in one of the state’s All State musical organizations

2 AP credits

3 or higher on at least 2 AP exams (beginning with the Class of 2025)

Reading - 22

Be selected as a National Merit Finalist or Semi-Finalist

- or -

 

Science - 23

Attain a score of 31 or higher ACT composite score

2 Dual enrollment, Dual Credit, Joint enrollment or online courses

 

 

Attain a score of 3 or higher on at least 2 AP exams

- or -

 

 

Successfully complete the International Baccalaureate Diploma Program

Any combination of two above

 

 

Earn 12 or more semester hours of postsecondary credit recorded on transcript.

80 hours of Community Service


 

 

 

"C" minimum in each TN/VA Scholars Course (Courses may be retaken to meet this requirement.)

 

 

 

95% attendance over the course of 4 years (No more than 36 total days)

 

 

 

No Out-of-School Suspensions

 

Graduating with District “Distinction”

State of Tennessee Honors

Work Ethic Distinction

Tennessee

Tri-Star Scholar

Seal of Biliteracy

Overall GPA of 3.0 or higher

Composite score of 19 or above on the ACT

Complete 1 or more languages in addition to English

See the next page for more information

Earned an industry certification in student’s career interest area or regional recognized industry certification

Earn a capstone industry certification as promoted by the Tn. Department of Education

Complete all English requirements with an overall GPA of 3.0 or above in those classes

 

 

 

Score advanced, on-track, or mastered on each English EOC taken

 

 

 

Achieve a passing score on a nationally recognized foreign language proficiency assessment

 

 



Ready Graduate Information

What is a Ready Grad?

At THS, we strive to make sure each student is ready for college, career and life after they graduate. This is measured each year on the types of courses we offer, tests students take and opportunities provided by THS to prepare students for whatever their paths are after they graduate. The TN Department of Education’s Ready Graduate Indicator is a statewide accountability measure that shows the percentage of students who are on-track for career and/or college success. A student can earn the distinction of Ready Grad by earning different Early Postsecondary Opportunities (EPSOs) throughout their high school journey. Having this distinction signifies that a student is ready to enter the workforce or to enter college upon completion of high school graduation requirements. 

How do I become a Ready Grad?

In order for a student to be considered a Ready Graduate from THS, they must complete at least one of the following criteria:

  • Earning an ACT Composite score of 21+ OR a SAT score of 1060+
  • Earn 4 EPSOs (defined below)
  • Earn 2 EPSOs +an Industry Certification
  • Earn 2 EPSOs + earn ASVAB AFQT score of 31+


What is an EPSO?

Early postsecondary opportunities (EPSOs) include a course and/or exam that give students a chance to obtain postsecondary credit while still in high school. Courses (whether stand-alone or in conjunction with an exam for postsecondary credit) must be aligned to postsecondary standards.


How do EPSOs benefit students?

EPSOs provide students the opportunity to take full advantage of the rigors of college and the workforce. Research has shown that students who participate in early postsecondary opportunities are more likely to enroll and persist in postsecondary environments and gain skills that employers are looking for in future employees.


What are the different types of EPSO’s THS offers?

Advanced Placement (AP) classes - An AP class is considered an advanced, or accelerated course where students can earn college credit by taking and earning a certain score on the associated AP exam. AP classes coincide with specific graduation requirements.

 

College Level Examination (CLEP) - A CLEP test can be taken in different classes offered at THS. The CLEP test reflects a rigorous experience in class that allows a student to show mastery of the given subject. Passing this test can help you earn college credit.

 

Dual Enrollment - Dual enrollment classes are classes that students can take to earn both high school AND college credit. Dual enrollment classes might transfer in at each college differently. By taking dual enrollment classes in high school, a student can reduce the number of classes that are taken at the college level.

 

Local Dual Credit (LDC) - A high school course that is aligned to local post secondary institution’s course and exam. Students who pass the exam earn credits that might be accepted and/or recognized by a local postsecondary institution.

 

Statewide Dual Credit (SDC) - A SDC class is a college-level course taught at the high school level by trained high school teachers.   

Work Ethic Diploma Distinction

 

The Work Ethic Diploma Distinction is a workforce readiness credential which provides students the opportunity to demonstrate key concepts which are important for success in both the workforce and postsecondary. When students earn this distinction, they are letting area employers know they put a focus on the 21st century skills and understand their role in getting hired and staying employed. Students who graduate with this distinction will be guaranteed an interview with partnering companies if they meet other qualifications.

 

The following companies and more recognize this distinction in Northeast Tennessee:

 


The Robinette Company

Ballad Health

Spherion Staffing Services

Mullican Flooring

Alcoa Howmett

TRW Automotive

Meritor, Inc.

Petoskey Plastics

General Electric

Lear Corporation

Rich’s Products Organization

Team Technologies, Inc.

Lisega, Inc.

Hutchinson

Renold Jeffrey

Iconex, LLC.

Bodycote

Original Footwear Co.

Tuff Torq Corp.

ColorTech, Inc.

WorkNow!, Inc.

Old Dominion Freight Line

@Work Personnel Services

Express Employment

Kelly Services, Inc.

Cooper Standard Automotive

Norris Homes

Baldor Electric Co.

Kawasaki TN, Inc.

International Paper

Mahle Powertrain LLC

JTEKT Automotive

Arconic

Ball Corporation

SI Group Inc.

American Appliance Products, Inc.

Worthington Industries

Phoenix Closures, Inc.

Eastern Plating, Inc.

         


To receive the Work Ethic Distinction a student must earn a minimum of 32 points and a regular high school diploma.

 

  1. Attendance
    • 1 pt :Student has no more than 5 absences from school during their senior year.
    • 2 pts : Student has no more than 3 absences from school during their senior year.
    • 3 pts : Student has no more than 1 absences from school during their senior year.
  2. Tardiness
    • 1 pt : Student has no more than two unexcused tardies to school during their senior year.
    • 2 pts : Student has no unexcused tardies to school during their senior year.
  3. Discipline
    • 1 pt : Student has no more than one discipline referral during their senior year.
    • 2 pts : Student has no discipline referrals during their senior year.
  4. Overall GPA
    • 1 pt : Student has an overall GPA of 2.0 to 2.9.
    • 2 pts : Student has an overall GPA of 3.0 to 3.4.
    • 3 pts : Student has an overall GPA of 3.5 or above.
  5. Drug Free
    • 5 pts : Student voluntarily presents written proof as being drug free.
  6. CTE Coursework
    • (1 pt.) CTE Participant - Student has completed and earned credit in at least one CTE course by the end of the senior year.
    • (2 pts.) CTE Concentrator - Student has completed and earned credit in two high school CTE courses, in sequence, in a single CTE program of study by the end of the senior year
    • (3 pts.) CTE Completer - Student has completed and earned credit in three or more high school CTE courses in a single CTE program of study by the end of the senior year
  7. CTE Competition
    • 1 pt : Student has competed in an approved regional level CTE competition during their senior year.
    • 2 pts : Student has competed in an approved state level CTE competition during their senior year.
    • 3 pts : Student has competed in an approved national level CTE competition during their senior year.
  8. Community Service Standard
    • (1 pt.) Student has completed 10 hours of community service during the senior year.
    • (2 pt.) Student has completed 20 hours of community service during the senior year.
    • (3 pt.) Student has completed 30 hours of community service during the senior year.
  9. Post-Secondary Plan Standard
    • (2 pts.) Student is in good standing with TN Promise, including having applied to an accredited post-secondary institution OR student has enlisted in the military student has enrolled in a registered apprenticeship after high school graduation.
  10. Dual Enrollment/Credit
    • 2 pts : Student has successfully completed a dual enrollment, dual credit, or Advanced Placement course and has been granted credit by any post-secondary institution during or before their senior year.
  11. Industry Certification
    • 2 pts : Student has received a national industry certification during or before their senior
  12. College and Career Assessment Standard
    • 2 pts : Student has achieved a Bronze Level National Career Readiness Certificate.
    • 4 pts : Student has achieved a Silver Level National Career Readiness Certificate.
    • 6 pts : Student has achieved a Gold or Platinum Level National Career Readiness Certificate.
  13. Work Experience Standard
    • (4 pts.) Student has participated in an internship OR approved career practicum/work- based learning course OR has held a part time job during the senior year.

 

* For additional information regarding the Work Ethic Diploma Distinction, please see CTE Director, Deidre Pendley or your Counselor.



Advanced Placement Program Expectations

The following chart is meant to give you an idea of how much time a student may be expected to prepare for each of the AP Courses. The time a student spends on assignments also varies depending on his/ her skill level. Different teachers for the same course may have slightly different expectations, but time commitment should be about the same.

Language Arts:

Course Name:

Reading per class

Study hours per class

Tests, essays and papers

Major Projects (including summer assignments)

Language and

Composition

  • 3-5 major works per year
  • Several varied passages/

nonfictional excerpts

 

½ hour to 1 hour per day

  • Weekly written responses
  • 2-3 prompts or timed writing per quarter
  • Quizzes or tests on terms and reading as needed
  • Suggested mock exam

Minimum:

  • 2-4 major projects during school year
  • A summer assignment is required.

Literature and Composition

2-3 major works per quarter

½ hour to 1 hour per day

  • At least 2 AP practice timed writing assignments per quarter
  • Two-three tests on major works per quarter
  • Suggested mock exam

A summer reading assignment is required.

 

Fine Arts:

Course Name

Reading per class

Study hours per class

Tests, essays and papers

Major Projects

Studio Art

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  • Ongoing visual journal or sketchbook assignments
  • At home completion of work

1 hour per day

  • 6-8 pieces of work per quarter
  • Attendance is essential
  • Unfinished class work to be completed at home

Development of major assignments to complete a portfolio of art work. The 4th quarter consists of a portfolio of 24 workshops and submissions.

Music Theory

 

  • On average, 20-25 textbook pages are covered per week

 

1-2 hours per

day

 

 Weekly aural assessments (listening and singing)

  • 3-4 tests per quarter
  • Mid-term and final exams
  • Mid-term project

 Final composition project

 

 

Mathematics:

Course name

Reading per class

Study hours per class

Tests, essays and papers

Major Projects

Calculus AB

5-10 pages

1-2 hours per day

  • Tests
  • Quizzes (daily)
  • Communication of mathematical processes and mathematical reasoning is essential
  • Review Notebook
  • Practice Free Response Questions
  • Homework packet

Computer Science

Principles

5-10 pages

1-2 hours per day

  • Tests
  • Quizzes
  • Review

    Notebook

  • Practice Homework

 

Science:

Course name

Reading per class

Study hours per class

Tests, essays and papers

Major Projects

Biology

  • 30-50 pages per week (varies per unit)

1-2 hours per day

  • Tests and quizzes
  • Free response writing practice
  • Assignments vary with units
  • Lab reports
  • 1 science project

Chemistry

  • 30-50 pages per week (varies per unit)
  • 25-30 problems per week

1-2 hours per day

  • Tests and quizzes
  • Free response writing practice
  • Assignments vary with units
  • Lab reports
  • 1 science project

Physics I

  • 20-30 pages per week (varies per unit)
  • 25-30 problems per week.

1-2 hours per day

  • Tests and quizzes
  • Free response writing practice
  • Assignment vary with units
  • Lab reports

 

 

Social Studies:

Course Name

Reading per class

Study Hours per class

Tests, essays and papers

Major Projects

US History

  • 40-60 pages per week
  • Supplemental reading as assigned
  • Document reading/analysis

1-2 hours per day

  • Unit tests/reading quizzes/practice AP exams
  • 3-4 essays per quarter
  • Special projects which may include papers and presentations

 

Human Geography

  • 40-60 pages per week
  • Supplemental reading as assigned

1-2 hours per day

  • Unit tests/quizzes/practice AP exams
  • 3-4 essays per quarter
  • Special projects which may include papers and presentations

 

Psychology

  • 40-60 pages per week
  • Supplemental reading as assigned

1-2 hours per day

  • Unit tests/quizzes/practice AP exams
  • 3-4 essays per semester
  • Special projects which may include papers and presentations
  • 1 tech lab per topic/subject area

 

 

****According to School Board policy, all students enrolling in an AP course will be required to take the AP exam in that course to receive an AP credit. Students not taking the AP exam will receive credit in the corresponding honors class.

EXAMPLE: Student A passes AP Chemistry and also takes the AP exam.

Student A will receive 5 points on each nine weeks average and the final exam along with transcript credit for AP Chemistry.

Student B passes AP Chemistry but opts not to take the AP exam.

Student B will receive 3 points on each nine weeks average and the final exam along with transcript credit for Honors Chemistry II.

 

SCHEDULE CHANGE GUIDELINES

Students wishing to request course changes must complete the schedule request form available online at http://ths.btcs.org/counseling.  Course requests will be accepted through the first two full days of school each semester. Students enrolled in dual enrollment classes may only change their schedule at the beginning of the term withing the first two days of class. Students may not withdraw from a mid- or late-term course. Requests for teacher preferences are not honored at any time.

 

During the first two days of school and upon the completion of new student enrollment, counselors will consider requests that meet one of the following guidelines:

 

  • A class on the schedule was taken and passed in summer school.
  • A class was failed in the second term of the previous year or in summer school that is a prerequisite for a course appearing on the schedule.
  • No English or math course appears on the schedule.
  • A senior is not registered for a required course for graduation.
  • Fewer than eight classes appear on the schedule.
  • Courses are not sequenced in prerequisite order on the schedule.
  • Student wishes to try a more challenging course in English, math, science, or social studies.

 

The following are not acceptable reasons for requesting a course change:

  • Teacher preference.
  • Fear of a low grade or course difficulty. (Keep this in mind when registering for Honors and/or AP courses).
  • Course is not required for graduation.
  • Student did not complete the summer reading requirement.

 

ENGLISH

          G01H0920  English I

                        This freshman-level introductory course focuses on close reading of a

                        variety of literary texts and genres, including fiction and nonfiction, as

                        well as developing skills in grammar and writing.  The course will

                        emphasize multiple formal writing styles, including narrative, argument,

                        and informational essay development, while utilizing research skills in

                        the writing process.  Preparation for the state-mandated assessment

                        (which counts as the student’s final exam grade and a percentage of the           

                        overall course grade) will also be imperative.

 

            G01H0910  English I (Honors)

Prerequisite: Students must earn a score at or above the 65th national percentile on the STAR Reading exam, score within the “On Track or Mastered” range on the 7th grade TNReady exam, have an A or B average, and receive a 4 on work ethic by 8th grade Honors English teacher.

This freshman-level introductory course focuses on close reading of a variety of literary texts and genres, including fiction and nonfiction, as well as developing sophisticated skills in grammar and writing.  The course will emphasize multiple formal writing styles, including narrative, argument, and informational essay development, while utilizing research skills in the writing process.  Preparation for the state-mandated assessment (which counts as the student’s exam grade and a percentage of the overall course grade) will also be imperative.

            G01H1020  English II

                        Prerequisite:  English I

                        This sophomore-level course focuses on developing close reading skills

                        with a variety of literary texts and genres, including fiction and nonfiction,

                        as well as developing skills in grammar and writing.  The course will

                        emphasize multiple formal writing styles, including narrative, argument,

                        and informational essay development, while utilizing research skills in

                        the writing process.  Preparation for the state-mandated assessment

                        (which counts as the student’s exam grade and a percentage of the

                        overall course grade) will also be imperative.

 

          G01H1010  English II (Honors)

                      Prerequisite: A or B in Honors English I. Samples of student work may be

                      Reviewed before placement in all Honors classes.

                      This sophomore-level course focuses on developing close reading skills

                      with a variety of literary texts and genres, including fiction and nonfiction,

                      as well as developing sophisticated skills in grammar and writing. The

                      course will emphasize multiple formal writing styles, including narrative,

                      argument, and informational essay development, while utilizing research

                      skills in the writing process.  Preparation for the state-mandated

                       assessment (which counts as the student’s exam grade and a percentage of the overall course grade) will also be imperative.

 

        G01H1120  English III

                      Prerequisite(s):  English I and English II

                      This junior-level course focuses on strengthening close reading skills with

                      an analysis primarily of American literary texts and genres, including

                      fiction and nonfiction, as well as improving overall writing style. The

                      course will emphasize formal essay development, including narrative,

                      argument, and informational arrangements, while utilizing advanced

                      research skills in the writing process. Students will also engage in

                      ACT English and Reading test-taking skills development

        G01H1700  AP English Language and Composition

Prerequisite; Junior, Honors English II with an A or B or an A in English II with teacher recommendation. Samples of student work may be reviewed before placement in an advanced placement course. AP English Literature should be taken in the student’s senior year as a follow-up to this class.

                     AP English Language is a college-level course designed for preparation for

                     the AP English Language and Composition Exam. This course engages

                     students in becoming skilled readers of prose written in a variety of

                     rhetorical contexts, and in becoming skilled writers who compose for a

                     variety of purposes. Writing assignments focus on the critical analysis of

                     language, including works of literary merit that are likely

                     to be taught in an introductory college language course. Note: Students

                     will only receive “AP” credit (5 additional points) for the course if

                     they take the AP exam; otherwise, only “Honors” credit will be

                     awarded (3 additional points).

 

        G01H1320  English IV

                     Prerequisites:  English I, II, and III

                     This senior-level course focuses on developing close reading skills with a

                     chronological progression of British literary texts and genres, including

                     fiction and nonfiction, also improving overall writing style. The course will

                     emphasize developing formal literary essay skills, as well as creating a

                     variety of technical texts, with a stress on expanding workplace skills that

can be used in the post-secondary world. Students who complete the Modern States online curriculum will have the opportunity to participate in the CLEP Composition exam.    

 

 

       G01H1800  AP English Literature and Composition  

                        Prerequisite: Honors English III with an A or B average. Samples of

                     student work may be reviewed before placement in an advanced

                     placement course.

                     AP English Literature is a college-level course designed for preparation for

                     the AP English Literature and Composition Exam.  Writing assignments

                     focus on the critical analysis of literature, including works of literary merit,

                     that are likely to be taught in an introductory college literature course.

                     College application essays and resumes are also addressed. Note: 

                     Students will only receive “AP” credit (5 additional points) for

                     the course if they take the AP exam; otherwise, only “Honors” credit

                     will be awarded (3 additional points).

 

ENGLISH ELECTIVES

 

        G01H1520  Journalism (Yearbook)

Students may only apply during the spring of their freshman year. Students must then be chosen by the faculty in order to be accepted into the class. Students in this class focus on design, formation, and publication of the Cadmea.

 

        G01H1521 Journalism Spring (Yearbook)

Students may only apply during the spring of their freshman year. Students must then be chosen by the faculty in order to be accepted into the class. Students in this class focus on design, formation, and publication of the Cadmea.

 

        G01H1550  Journalism (Maroon & White)

Prerequisites: Application and English teacher recommendation.

Maroon & White is designed to give students the reporting, writing, editing, and publishing skills necessary to produce a school newspaper, while exposing them to the many journalism-related careers that are available. Students acquire skills in copy-editing, news, sports, feature, and editorial writing, and advertising. See application process at the end of the course catalog.

 

 

 

        G01H1551 Journalism Spring Semester (Maroon & White)

 

Prerequisites: Application and English teacher recommendation.

Maroon & White is designed to give students the reporting, writing, editing, and publishing skills necessary to produce a school newspaper, while exposing them to the many journalism-related careers that are available. Students acquire skills in copy-editing, news, sports, feature, and editorial writing, and advertising. See application process at the end of the course catalog.

         

       G01H7420  Mythology/Etymology

This English elective course introduces word roots and derivatives from both Greek and Latin. It also fully covers the classic book, Edith Hamilton's Mythology, which introduces Norse mythology, Greek heroes, gods, goddesses, the Trojan War, and The Odyssey.

 

       G01H0020  Creative Writing I

Open to all students who are interested in writing, this class   

explores a variety of writing skills and elements including, but not limited to, short stories and poetry. The primary focus is the introduction of various forms and methods of writing. This class is writing intensive.

 

        G01H0620  Speech and Communications

                      Prerequisite:  Preferred junior and senior students (sophomores allowed

                      by teacher recommendation).

                      This class is designed to teach students effective communication skills in

                      a variety of communicative settings. Students practice preparing,

                      organizing, and creating presentations, which will help students develop

                      their confidence and strengthen their speaking from the stage or at an

                      interview.

 

FINE ARTS

      NOTE: Students are limited to earning a total of 1 (one) credit per

                  semester in Instrumental Music (with the exception of

                  Drum Majors).

 

        G05H0820  Art I

This is a survey course in art that covers the basics of drawing, painting, design, clay work, and photography, while meeting the fine arts requirement for college bound students.

 

        G05H0920  Art II

Pre-requisites: An 85 or higher in Art I and/or recommendation of Art I teacher.

This is an elective art course that deals primarily with advanced drawing and painting. Students will work with pencil, ink, charcoal, colored pencil, pastel, watercolor, acrylic, oil, and batik.

 

        G05H1020  Art III

Pre-requisites: An 85 or higher in Art II and/or the recommendation of Art II teacher. This is an advanced elective art course that involves study of design, sculpture, ceramics, printmaking, and advanced photography.

 

         G05H2400  AP Art

Pre-requisites: An 85 or higher in previous art classes and the signed recommendation of former art teachers.

This is a college level course designed to prepare a student to complete an A.P. portfolio in either Drawing and Painting, 2-D Design, or 3-D Design; and to perform on the level of at least a first year college art design student. As a requirement of the AP Exam, you will be required to present and defend your portfolio. There will be some summer preparation expected.

    

        G05H8420  Marching Band

                    Prerequisite: Teacher approval.

                    Students enrolled in this course will participate in marching band in the fall.

 

        G05H3620  Instrumental Music: Brass Woodwinds

Prerequisite: Teacher approval.

Students enrolled in this course will participate in concert band in the spring.

           

        G05H3820  Instrumental Music: Color Guard

Prerequisite: Teacher approval

This course is for students participating in the color guard during the fall

semester.

 

        G05H3720  Instrumental Music: Percussion

                      Prerequisite: Teacher approval

                      This course is for the percussion section in the fall and spring.

   

        G05H4020  Concert Choir

Students will sing music in preparation for fall, winter and spring concerts as well as off-campus performances and spring competitions. Students will learn to read musical notation and develop healthy vocal technique.  Performance participation is mandatory and all students must procure concert attire. 

 

        G05H1120 General Music

General Music courses provide students with an understanding of music and its importance in their lives. Course content focuses on how various styles of music apply musical elements to create an expressive or aesthetic impact. Students also have the ability for informal music performance and creation within the classroom. Instruction may include music theory, music history, and other studies in music.

 

        G05H4220  Women’s Ensemble